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Quote of the day: He was looked up to with reverence for h
Notes
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Historiae by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book V Chapter 14: The Batavian Uprise. Civilis at Castra Vetera[AD 70]
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Meanwhile Civilis, having recruited his army from Germany after his defeat among the Treveri, took up his position at Castra Vetera, where his situation would protect him, and where the courage of his barbarian troops would be raised by the recollection of successes gained on the spot. He was followed to this place by Cerialis, whose forces had now been doubled by the arrival of the 2nd, 6th, and 14th legions. The auxiliary infantry and cavalry, summoned long before, had hastened to join him after his victory. Neither of the generals loved delay. But a wide extent of plain naturally saturated with water kept them apart. Civilis had also thrown a dam obliquely across the Rhine, so that the stream, diverted by the obstacle, might overflow the adjacent country. Such was the character of the district, full of hidden perils from the varying depth of the fords, and unfavourable to our troops. The Roman soldier is heavily armed and afraid to swim, while the German, who is accustomed to rivers, is favoured by the lightness of his equipment and the height of his stature.

Event: The Batavian Uprise