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Quote of the day: Nay, rather, that you may know what has
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Historiae by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book I Chapter 11: Galba becomes emperor. Africa[AD 69]
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Ever since the time of the Divine Augustus Roman knights have ruled Egypt as kings, and the forces by which it has to be kept in subjection. It has been thought expedient thus to keep under home control a province so difficult of access, so productive of corn, ever distracted, excitable, and restless through the superstition and licentiousness of its inhabitants, knowing nothing of laws, and unused to civil rule. Its governor was at this time Tiberius Alexander, a native of the country. Africa and its legions, now that Clodius Macer was dead, were disposed to be content with any emperor, after having experienced the rule of a smaller tyrant. The two divisions of Mauretania, Rhaetia, Noricum and Thrace and the other provinces governed by procurators, as they were near this or that army, were driven by the presence of such powerful neighbours into friendship or hostility. The unarmed provinces with Italy at their head were exposed to any kind of slavery, and were ready to become the prize of victory. Such was the state of the Roman world, when Servius Galba, consul for the second time, with Titus Vinius for his colleague, entered upon a year, which was to be the last of their lives, and which well nigh brought the common-wealth to an end.

Event: Galba becomes emperor