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Quote of the day: The dark complexion of the Silures, thei
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Annals by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book III Chapter 65: Flattered by the Senate[AD 22]
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My purpose is not to relate at length every motion, but only such as were conspicuous for excellence or notorious for infamy. This I [Note 1] regard as history's highest function, to let no worthy action be uncommemorated, and to hold out the reprobation of posterity as a terror to evil words and deeds. So corrupted indeed and debased was that age by sycophancy that not only the foremost citizens who were forced to save their grandeur by servility, but every ex-consul, most of the ex-praetors and a host of inferior senators would rise in eager rivalry to propose shameful and preposterous motions. Tradition says that Tiberius as often as he left the Senate-House used to exclaim in Greek, "How ready these men are to be slaves." Clearly, even he, with his dislike of public freedom, was disgusted at the abject abasement of his creatures.

Note 1 : I = Tacitus