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Quote of the day: Urgulania's influence, however, was so f

Geographical entities: Quotes and links to a source

List of used abbreviations:
Agr:
Ann:
Aug:
Dbg:
Ger:
Gth:
His:
Hor:
Msp:
NwT:
Ovd:
Plt:
Stn:
Vrg:
Tacitus' Agricola.
Tacitus' Annals.
The Deeds of the Divine Augustus
De Bello Gallico, by Julius Caesar
Tacitus' Germania.
The Goths, by Jordanes.
Histories, by Tacitus.
History of Rome, by Livy.
Mispogon by Julian
New Testament.
Metamorphosis by Ovid.
Parallel lives by Plutarch.
Suetonius 12 Caesars
Virgil Aeneid.

Quotes:

Aeduans
Prove to these Aedui once for all that the more they abound in wealth and luxury, the more unwarlike are they
Ann Book III Chapter 46: Revolt of the Gauls. The Aedui beaten

Aesti
They are the only people who gather amber. They call it glasing, and find it amongst the shallows and upon the very shore.
Ger Chapter 45: Aestyans, amber and Sitones

Alba
The inhabitants of Alba did not think fugitives worthy of being received and incorporated as citizens among them
Plt Romulus, chapter 9: The Foundation of Rome (cont.)

Amazon
They appointed a day for meeting once in every year, so that when they should return to the same place on that day in the following year each mother might give over to the father whatever male child she had borne, but should herself keep and train for warfare whatever children of the female sex were born.
Gth Chapter 8: The Amazones (Cont.)

Amazon
They exposed the males, destroying the life of the ill-fated child with a hate like that of a step-mother.
Gth Chapter 8: The Amazones (Cont.)

Amazon
Among them childbearing was detested, though everywhere else it is desired.
Gth Chapter 8: The Amazones (Cont.)

Amazon
It is related that in this battle there were Amazons fighting as auxiliaries with the barbarians, and that they came down from the mountains by the river Thermodon.
Plt Pompey Chapter 35: The Albanians revolt.

Anglesea
On the shore stood the opposing army with its dense array of armed warriors while between the ranks dashed women, in black attire like the Furies, with hair dishevelled, waving brands. All around, the Druids, lifting up their hands to heaven, and pouring forth dreadful imprecations, scared our soldiers by the unfamiliar sight, so that, as if their limbs were paralysed, they stood motionless, and exposed to wounds.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 30: Further problems in Britain. Mona conquered

Antioch
Liars and dancers, well skilled to dance in a chorus
Msp Chapter 12

Antioch
O most ignorant and quarrelsome of men!
Msp Chapter 7

Arcae
46 Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 1.

Ardeates
This people who were at that time in possession of Ardea, were, considering the nature of their country and the age in which they lived, exceptionally wealthy. This circumstance really originated the war, for the Roman king was anxious to repair his own fortune, which had been exhausted by the magnificent scale of his public works and also to conciliate his subjects by a distribution of the spoils of war.
Hor Book I Chapter 57: The Rape of Lucretia.

Bataves
Batavians, who are the natives of an island of the Rhine, and are esteemed the best of the German horse
Plt Otho Chapter 12: Otho versus Vitellius: the battle of Bedriacum

Bataves
New reinforcements were supplied by Varus Alfenius with his Batavians. They had routed the band of gladiators, which had been ferried across the river, and which had been cut to pieces by the opposing cohorts while they were actually in the water. Thus flushed with victory, they charged the flank of the enemy.
His Book II Chapter 43: Otho versus Vitellius. The battle of Bedriacum (cont.)

Bataves
The Gauls they urged to fight for freedom, the Batavi for glory, the Germans for plunder.
His Book IV Chapter 78: The Batavian Uprise. Cerialis victorious

Bataves
Of all these nations, the Batavians are the most signal in bravery. They inhabit not much territory upon the Rhine, but possess an island in it. They were formerly part of the Cat tans, and by means of feuds at home removed to these dwellings; whence they might become a portion of the Roman empire.
Ger Chapter 29: Batavians and Mattiacians

Bataves
They behaved themselves insolently, boasting, as they visited the quarters of the several legions, that they had mastered the men of the 14th, that they had taken Italy from Nero, that the whole destiny of the war lay in their hands
His Book II Chapter 27: Otho versus Vitellius. The Batavian mutiny

Bataves
The Batavian cohorts were sent back to Germany, lest they should venture on further violence. Destiny was thus simultaneously preparing the occasions of civil war and of foreign war
His Book II Chapter 69: Vitellius emperor. The soldiers are sent back

Bataves
They had also at home a select body of cavalry, who practised with special devotion the art of swimming, so that they could stem the stream of the Rhine with their arms and horses, without breaking the order of their squadrons.
His Book IV Chapter 12: The Batavians

Bataves
Our bravest men
His Book II Chapter 28: Otho versus Vitellius. The Batavian mutiny (cont.)

Bataves
The Batavians, while they dwelt on the other side of the Rhine, formed a part of the tribe of the Chatti. Driven out by a domestic revolution, they took possession of an uninhabited district on the extremity of the coast of Gaul, and also of a neighbouring island, surrounded by the ocean in front, and by the river Rhine in the rear and on either side.
His Book IV Chapter 12: The Batavians

Bataves
There were indeed in the territory of the Lingones eight Batavian cohorts, which formed the auxiliary force of the 14th legion, but which had, among the many dissensions of the time, withdrawn from it; a body of troops which, to whatever side they might incline, would, whether as allies or enemies, throw a vast weight into the scale
His Book I Chapter 59: Revolt of Vitellius. Julius Civilis

Bataves
The rear of the auxiliaries, and the Batavi among the number, plunging recklessly into the water and displaying their skill in swimming,
Ann Book II Chapter 8: War with the Germans. The Chatti (cont.)

Belgium
Of all these, the Belgae are the bravest, because they are furthest from the civilization and refinement of [our] Province, and merchants least frequently resort to them,
Dbg Book I Chapter 1: Introduction

Belgium
Though they proffer their aid, to have the glory and honour of having rescued the name of Rome and quelled the tribes of Germany.
Ann Book I Chapter 43: Revolt in Germania. Speech of Germanicus (cont.)

Belgium
The interior portion of Britain is inhabited by those of whom they say that it is handed down by tradition that they were born in the island itself: the maritime portion by those who had passed over from the country of the Belgae for the purpose of plunder and making war; almost all of whom are called by the names of those states from which being sprung they went thither, and having waged war, continued there and began to cultivate the lands.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Britain
Ten and even twelve have wives common to them, and particularly brothers among brothers, and parents among their children; but if there be any issue by these wives, they are reputed to be the children of those by whom respectively each was first espoused when a virgin.
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Britain
The island of Britain, which is situated in the bosom of Ocean between Spain, Gaul and Germany.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Britain
Britain, the largest of the islands which Roman geography includes, is so situated that it faces Germany on the east, Spain on the west; on the south it is even within sight of Gaul; its northern extremities, which have no shores opposite to them, are beaten by the waves of a vast open sea. The form of the entire country has been compared by Livy and Fabius Rusticus, the most graphic among ancient and modern historians, to an oblong shield or battle-axe.
Agr Chapter 10: Geography of Britain

Britain
Most of them say it is like a triangle pointing between the north and west. Its widest angle faces the mouths of the Rhine. Then the island shrinks in breadth and recedes until it ends in two other angles. Its long doubled side faces Gaul and Germany. Its greatest breadth is said to be over two thousand three hundred and ten stadia, and its length not more than seven thousand one hundred and thirty-two stadia.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Britain
Moreover Strabo, a famous writer of the Greeks, relates that the island exhales such mists from its soil, soaked by the frequent inroads of Ocean, that the sun is covered throughout the whole of their disagreeable sort of day that passes as fair, and so is hidden from sight.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Britain
All the people and their kings are alike wild
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Britain
They fight not only on horseback or on foot, but even with scythed two-horse chariots, which they commonly call essedae.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Britain
They wear their hair long, and have every part of their body shaved except their head and upper lip.
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Britain
They live in wattled huts, a shelter used in common with their flocks, and often the woods are their home. They paint their bodies with iron-red, whether by way of adornment or perhaps for some other reason.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Britain
Tin produced in the midland regions; in the maritime, iron; but the quantity of it is small: they employ brass, which is imported
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Britain
In that part of Britain which looks toward Ireland, he posted some troops, hoping for fresh conquests rather than fearing attack, inasmuch as Ireland, being between Britain and Spain and conveniently situated for the seas round Gaul, might have been the means of connecting with great mutual benefit the most powerful parts of the empire.
Agr Chapter 24: Agricola in Britain. On Ireland

Britain
The Britons themselves bear cheerfully the conscription, the taxes, and the other burdens imposed on them by the empire, if there be no oppression
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Britain
The most civilized of all these nations are they who inhabit Kent, which is entirely a maritime district, nor do they differ much from the Gallic customs.
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Britain
Britain contains gold and silver and other metals, as the prize of conquest. The ocean, too, produces pearls, but of a dusky and bluish hue. Some think that those who collect them have not the requisite skill, as in the Red Sea the living and breathing pearl is torn from the rocks, while in Britain they are gathered just as they are thrown up. I could myself more readily believe that the natural properties of the pearls are in fault than our keenness for gain.
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Britain
All the Britains indeed, dye themselves with wood, which occasions a bluish color, and thereby have a more terrible appearance in fight
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Britain
The interior portion of Britain is inhabited by those of whom they say that it is handed down by tradition that they were born in the island itself: the maritime portion by those who had passed over from the country of the Belgae for the purpose of plunder and making war; almost all of whom are called by the names of those states from which being sprung they went thither, and having waged war, continued there and began to cultivate the lands.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Britain
The ocean, too, produces pearls, but of a dusky and bluish hue
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Britain
They use either brass or iron rings, determined at a certain weight, as their money.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Britain
Their mode of fighting with their chariots is this: firstly, they drive about in all directions and throw their weapons and generally break the ranks of the enemy with the very dread of their horses and the noise of their wheels; and when they have worked themselves in between the troops of horse, leap from their chariots and engage on foot.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 33: Caesar in Britain. Way of fighting of the Britains.

Britain
They do not regard it lawful to eat the hare, and the cock, and the goose; they, however, breed them for amusement and pleasure
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Britain
Their sky is obscured by continual rain and cloud. Severity of cold is unknown. The days exceed in length those of our part of the world; the nights are bright, and in the extreme north so short that between sunlight and dawn you can perceive but a slight distinction. It is said that, if there are no clouds in the way, the splendour of the sun can be seen throughout the night, and that he does not rise and set, but only crosses the heavens. The truth is, that the low shadow thrown from the flat extremities of the earth's surface does not raise the darkness to any height, and the night thus fails to reach the sky and stars.
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Britain
Their strength is in infantry. Some tribes fight also with the chariot. The higher in rank is the charioteer; the dependants fight. They were once ruled by kings, but are now divided under chieftains into factions and parties. Our greatest advantage in coping with tribes so powerful is that they do not act in concert. Seldom is it that two or three states meet together to ward off a common danger. Thus, while they fight singly, all are conquered.
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Britain
The island is triangular in its form, and one of its sides is opposite to Gaul. One angle of this side, which is in Kent, whither almost all ships from Gaul are directed, [looks] to the east; the lower looks to the south. This side extends about 500 miles. Another side lies toward Spain and the west, on which part is Ireland, less, as is reckoned, than Britain, by one half: but the passage [from it] into Britain is of equal distance with that from Gaul. In the middle of this voyage, is an island, which is called Mona: many smaller islands besides are supposed to lie [there], of which islands some have written that at the time of the winter solstice it is night there for thirty consecutive days.
Dbg Book V Chapter 13: Caesar in Britain. Britain, Ireland, Man.

Britain
But a general survey inclines me to believe that the Gauls established themselves in an island so near to them. Their religious belief may be traced in the strongly-marked British superstition. The language differs but little; there is the same boldness in challenging danger, and, when it is near, the same timidity in shrinking from it. The Britons, however, exhibit more spirit, as being a people whom a long peace has not yet enervated. Indeed we have understood that even the Gauls were once renowned in war; but, after a while, sloth following on ease crept over them, and they lost their courage along with their freedom. This too has happened to the long-conquered tribes of Britain; the rest are still what the Gauls once were.
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons

Britain
Those who are nearest to the Gauls are also like them, either from the permanent influence of original descent, or, because in countries which run out so far to meet each other, climate has produced similar physical qualities.
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons

Britain
Most of the inland inhabitants do not sow corn, but live on milk and flesh, and are clad with skins
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Britain
The number of the people is countless, and their buildings exceedingly numerous, for the most part very like those of the Gauls: the number of cattle is great.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Bulgaria
The Bulgares, well known from the wrongs done to them by reason of our oppression.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Carthage
A Carthaginian enemy draws after him from the remotest regions of the world, from the straits of the ocean and the pillars of Hercules, a body of soldiers who are not even natives of Africa, destitute of all laws, and of the condition and almost of the language of men.
Quote by Gaius Terentius Varro
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 5: Speech of Terentius

Carthage
Ruthless was its quest of war.
Vrg Book I Chapter 3: Carthage

Chattes
They had not only a passion for settling every question by arms, but also a deep-rooted superstition that such localities are specially near to heaven, and that mortal prayers are nowhere more attentively heard by the gods.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 57: Events in the North. Chatti and Hermunduri

Chattes
As soon as they arrive to maturity of years, they let their hair and beards continue to grow, nor till they have slain an enemy do they ever lay aside this form of countenance by vow sacred to valour.
Ger Chapter 31: The hair of the Chattans

Chaucians
A people of all the Germans the most noble, such as would rather maintain their grandeur by justice than violence
Ger Chapter 35: Chaucians

Chaucians
The most warlike of his cohorts, which consisted of Chauci and Frisii,
His Book IV Chapter 79: The Batavian Uprise. Further fights

Cheruscans
For when the Romans had departed and they were free from the fear of an invader, these tribes, according to the custom of the race, and then specially as rivals in fame, had turned their arms against each other
Ann Book II Chapter 44: War with the Germans. Drusus as commander.

Cheruscans
The Cheruscans, they who formerly bore the character of good and upright, are now called cowards and fools
Ger Chapter 36: Cheruscans

Chinese
The Seres, a race that dwelt at the very beginning of their history on the shore of the Caspian Sea.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Colophon
He touched at Colophon, to consult the oracle of the Clarian Apollo. There, it is not a woman, as at Delphi, but a priest chosen from certain families, generally from Miletus, who ascertains simply the number and the names of the applicants. Then descending into a cave and drinking a draught from a secret spring, the man, who is commonly ignorant of letters and of poetry, utters a response in verse answering to the thoughts conceived in the mind of any inquirer.
Ann Book II Chapter 54: Germanicus goes East. To Colophon.

Crete
12 One of themselves, even a prophet of their own, said, the Cretians are alway liars, evil beasts, slow bellies.
Nwt Letter of Paul to Titus Chapter 1

Cypre
Then came the Cyprians on behalf of three shrines, the oldest of which had been set up by their founder Aerias to the Paphian Venus, the second by his son Amathus to Venus of Amathus, and the last to Jupiter of Salamis, by Teucer when he fled from the wrath of his father Telamon.
Ann Book III Chapter 62: Sanctuaries in Greece: Magnesia, Aphrodisia, Stratonicea and Cyprus

Dacia
The Dacians were also were in motion, a people which never can be trusted,
His Book III Chapter 46: Troubles with Dacia

Egypt
He abolished foreign cults, especially the Egyptian and the Jewish rites, compelling all who were addicted to such superstitions to burn their religious vestments and all their paraphernalia
Stn Tiberius Chapter 36: Foreign cults.

Egypt
It has been thought expedient thus to keep under home control a province so difficult of access, so productive of corn, ever distracted, excitable, and restless through the superstition and licentiousness of its inhabitants, knowing nothing of laws, and unused to civil rule.
His Book I Chapter 11: Galba becomes emperor. Africa

Egypt
The Egyptians worship many animals and image of monstrous form; the Jews have purely mental conceptions of Deity, as one in essence. They call those profane who make representations of God in human shape out of perishable materials. They believe that Being to be supreme and eternal, neither capable of representation, nor of decay. They therefore do not allow any images to stand in their cities, much less in their temples. This flattery is not paid to their kings, nor this honour to our Emperors.
His Book V Chapter 5: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus (cont.)

Egypt
There was a debate too about expelling the Egyptian and Jewish worship, and a resolution of the Senate was passed that four thousand of the freedmen class who were infected with those superstitions and were of military age should be transported to the island of Sardinia to quell the brigandage of the place, a cheap sacrifice should they die from the pestilential climate.
Ann Book II Chapter 85: On prostitution.

Ephese
First of all came the people of Ephesus. They declared that Diana and Apollo were not born at Delos, as was the vulgar belief. They had in their own country a river Cenchrius, a grove Ortygia, where Latona, as she leaned in the pangs of labour on an olive still standing, gave birth to those two deities, whereupon the grove at the divine intimation was consecrated.
Ann Book III Chapter 61: Sanctuaries in Greece: Ephesus

Etruria
It stood recorded in the Books of Fate, and had been handed down by the Occult Science of the Etruscans, that whenever the water of the Alban Lake overflowed and the Romans drew it off in the appointed way, the victory over the Veientines would be granted them; until that happened the gods would not desert the walls of Veii.
Hor Book V Chapter 15: War with Veii. The Rise of the Alban Lake. Mission to Delphi.

Etruria
There were no soothsayers to consult as to how to expiate them, owing to the hostile attitude of the Etruscans,
Hor Book V Chapter 15: War with Veii. The Rise of the Alban Lake. Mission to Delphi.

Etruria
The Etruscans as a nation were distinguished above all others by their devotion to religious observances, because they excelled in the knowledge and conduct of them.
Hor Book V Chapter 1: Veii elects a king.

Etruria
As a matter of fact, Gauls crossed into Italy two centuries before they attacked Clusium and took Rome.
Hor Book V Chapter 33: The Migrations of the Gauls into Italy.

Etruria
The Alpine tribes are undoubtedly of the same [Etruscan] stock, especially the Raetii, who had through the nature of their country become so uncivilised that they retained no trace of their original condition except their language, and even this was not free from corruption.
Hor Book V Chapter 33: The Migrations of the Gauls into Italy.

Etruria
Thus the Etruscans, now all but victorious, were hemmed in and cut to pieces. A very small remnant, after losing their general, made for Rome, as there was no nearer place of safety. Without arms, and in the guise of suppliants, they were kindly received and distributed amongst different houses. After recovering from their wounds, some left for their homes, to tell of the kind hospitality they had received; many remained behind out of affection for their hosts and the City. A district was assigned to them to dwell in, which subsequently bore the designation of "the Tuscan quarter."
Hor Book II Chapter 14: Final Attempt to restore the Tarquins.

Finland
Finns, milder than all the inhabitants of Scandza.
Gth Chapter 3: About Scandza.

Frisia
Primitive people
Ann Book XIII Chapter 54: Events in the North. Revolt of the Frisians

Frisia
Both nations stretch along the Rhine, quite to the ocean; and surround vast lakes such as once have borne Roman fleets.
Ger Chapter 34: The Frisians

Frisia
The most warlike of his cohorts, which consisted of Chauci and Frisii,
His Book IV Chapter 79: The Batavian Uprise. Further fights

Frisia
No one ever severely scrutinized the size or thickness till Olennius, a first-rank centurion, appointed to govern the Frisii, selected hides of wild bulls as the standard according to which they were to be supplied. This would have been hard for any nation, and it was the less tolerable to the Germans, whose forests abound in huge beasts, while their home cattle are undersized. First it was their herds, next their lands, last, the persons of their wives and children, which they gave up to bondage. Then came angry remonstrances, and when they received no relief, they sought a remedy in war
Ann Book IV Chapter 72: Revolt in Frisia

Galatia
1 O foolish Galatians, who hath bewitched you
Quote by Paul
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Galathians Chapter 3

Garamantes
The Garamantes, a wild race incessantly occupied in robbing their neighbours.
His Book IV Chapter 50: Lucius Piso murdered (cont.)

Gaul
And there was formerly a time when the Gauls excelled the Germans in prowess, and waged war on them offensively, and, on account of the great number of their people and the insufficiency of their land, sent colonies over the Rhine.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 24: Previous wars between Gauls and Germans.

Gaul
The nation of all the Gauls is extremely devoted to superstitious rites; and on that account they who are troubled with unusually severe diseases, and they who are engaged in battles and dangers, either sacrifice men as victims, or vow that they will sacrifice them, and employ the Druids as the performers of those sacrifices; because they think that unless the life of a man be offered for the life of a man, the mind of the immortal gods can not be rendered propitious, and they have sacrifices of that kind ordained for national purposes.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 16: The Gauls: their rites.

Gaul
Others have figures of vast size, the limbs of which formed of osiers they fill with living men, which being set on fire, the men perish enveloped in the flames. They consider that the oblation of such as have been taken in theft, or in robbery, or any other offense, is more acceptable to the immortal gods; but when a supply of that class is wanting, they have recourse to the oblation of even the innocent.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 16: The Gauls: their rites.

Gaul
The Gauls run down to the bank to meet them with various whoopings and songs, according to their custom, shaking their shields above their heads, and brandishing their weapons in their right hands.
Hor Book XXI Chapter 28: The crossing of the Rhone (cont.)

Gaul
They worship as their divinity, Mercury in particular, and have many images of him, and regard him as the inventor of all arts, they consider him the guide of their journeys and marches, and believe him to have great influence over the acquisition of gain and mercantile transactions
Dbg Book VI Chapter 17: The Gauls: their Gods.

Gaul
When they have conquered, they sacrifice whatever captured animals may have survived the conflict, and collect the other things into one place. In many states you may see piles of these things heaped up in their consecrated spots; nor does it often happen that any one, disregarding the sanctity of the case, dares either to secrete in his house things captured, or take away those deposited; and the most severe punishment, with torture, has been established for such a deed.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 17: The Gauls: their Gods.

Gaul
In Gaul there are factions not only in all the states, and in all the cantons and their divisions, but almost in each family, and of these factions those are the leaders who are considered according to their judgment to possess the greatest influence, upon whose will and determination the management of all affairs and measures depends
Dbg Book VI Chapter 11: The Gauls: their society.

Gaul
They regard it as indecorous for a son of boyish age to stand in public in the presence of his father.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 18: The Gauls: their descend.

Gaul
But a general survey inclines me to believe that the Gauls established themselves in an island so near to them. Their religious belief may be traced in the strongly-marked British superstition. The language differs but little; there is the same boldness in challenging danger, and, when it is near, the same timidity in shrinking from it. The Britons, however, exhibit more spirit, as being a people whom a long peace has not yet enervated. Indeed we have understood that even the Gauls were once renowned in war; but, after a while, sloth following on ease crept over them, and they lost their courage along with their freedom. This too has happened to the long-conquered tribes of Britain; the rest are still what the Gauls once were.
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons

Gaul
Those who are coming here in loose and disorderly fashion are a race to whom nature has given bodies and minds distinguished by bulk rather than by resolution and endurance. I
Quote by Camillus
Hor Book V Chapter 44: Invasion of the Gauls. Camillus speaks to the people of Ardea

Gaul
Whatever sums of money the husbands have received in the name of dowry from their wives, making an estimate of it, they add the same amount out of their own estates. An account is kept of all this money conjointly, and the profits are laid by: whichever of them shall have survived [the other], to that one the portion of both reverts together with the profits of the previous time.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 19: The Gauls: their marriages.

Gaul
Husbands have power of life and death over their wives as well as over their children:
Dbg Book VI Chapter 19: The Gauls: their marriages.

Gaul
Their funerals, considering the state of civilization among the Gauls, are magnificent and costly; and they cast into the fire all things, including living creatures, which they suppose to have been dear to them when alive; and, a little before this period, slaves and dependents, who were ascertained to have been beloved by them, were, after the regular funeral rites were completed, burnt together with them.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 19: The Gauls: their marriages.

Gaul
When they are gorged with food and the wine they drink so greedily, they throw themselves down like wild beasts, on the approach of night, in all directions by the streams, without entrenching themselves, or setting any outposts or pickets on guard. And now after their success they are more careless than ever.
Hor Book V Chapter 44: Invasion of the Gauls. Camillus speaks to the people of Ardea

Gaul
As a nation they are by no means inattentive to the claims of religion.
Hor Book V Chapter 46: Invasion of the Gauls. Camillus appointed dictator.

Gaul
All the Gauls assert that they are descended from the god Dis, and say that this tradition has been handed down by the Druids. For that reason they compute the divisions of every season, not by the number of days, but of nights; they keep birthdays and the beginnings of months and years in such an order that the day follows the night.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 18: The Gauls: their descend.

Gaul
Their extreme eagerness for the water and their impatience of the heat weakened the constitutions of the Germans and Gauls, always liable to disease.
His Book II Chapter 93: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius' army

Gaul
As a nation they cannot control their passions
Hor Book V Chapter 37: Invasion of the Gauls. The attack.

Gaul
For it is the custom of that people to compel travelers to stop, even against their inclination, and inquire what they may have heard, or may know, respecting any matter; and in towns the common people throng around merchants and force them to state from what countries they come, and what affairs they know of there. They often engage in resolutions concerning the most important matters, induced by these reports and stories alone; of which they must necessarily instantly repent, since they yield to mere unauthorized reports; and since most people give to their questions answers framed agreeably to their wishes.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 5: War with the Germans. Caesar does not trust the Gauls.

Gaul
Laboring cattle, in which the Gauls take the greatest pleasure, and which they procure at a great price,
Dbg Book IV Chapter 2: War with the Germans. About the Suevi(Cont.)

Gaul
The Gauls they urged to fight for freedom, the Batavi for glory, the Germans for plunder.
His Book IV Chapter 78: The Batavian Uprise. Cerialis victorious

Gaul
Nothing was to be intrusted to them
Dbg Book IV Chapter 5: War with the Germans. Caesar does not trust the Gauls.

Gaul
Or as the temper of the Gauls is impetuous and ready to undertake wars, so their mind is weak, and by no means resolute in enduring calamities.
Dbg Book III Chapter 19: Sabinus against Viridovix. The battle.

Geloni
He banished from Rome all the Jews, who were continually making disturbances at the instigation of one Chrestus.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Germans
They have likewise another method of divination, whence to learn the issue of great and mighty wars. From the nation with whom they are at war they contrive, it avails not how, to gain a captive: him they engage in combat with one selected from amongst themselves, each armed after the manner of his country, and according as the victory falls to this or to the other, gather a presage of the whole.
Ger Chapter 10: Omens and divining

Germans
Without being armed they transact nothing, whether of public or private concernment
Ger Chapter 13: Carrying weapons

Germans
In the day of battle, it is scandalous to the Prince to be surpassed in feats of bravery, scandalous to his followers to fail in matching the bravery of the Prince. But it is infamy during life, and indelible reproach, to return alive from a battle where their Prince was slain. To preserve their Prince, to defend him, and to ascribe to his glory all their own valorous deeds, is the sum and most sacred part of their oath.
Ger Chapter 14: On the battle-field

Germans
But to this nation it is peculiar, to learn presages and admonitions divine from horses also. These are nourished by the State in the same sacred groves and woods, all milk-white and employed in no earthly labour. These yoked in the holy chariot, are accompanied by the Priest and the king, or the Chief the of Community, who both carefully observed his actions and neighing.
Ger Chapter 10: Omens and divining

Germans
For their covering a mantle is what they all wear, fastened with a clasp or, for want of it, with a thorn. As far as this reaches not they are naked, and lie whole days before the fire.
Ger Chapter 17: Their cloths

Germans
Yet the laws of matrimony are severely observed there; nor in the whole of their manners is aught more praiseworthy than this: for they are almost the only Barbarians contented with one wife, excepting a very few amongst them; men of dignity who marry divers wives, from no wantonness or lubricity, but courted for the lustre of their family into many alliances
Ger Chapter 18: Marriages

Germans
To the husband, the wife tenders no dowry; but the husband, to the wife
Ger Chapter 18: Marriages

Germans
To restrain generation and the increase of children, is esteemed an abominable sin, as also to kill infants newly born. And more powerful with them are good manners, than with other people are good laws.
Ger Chapter 19: Marriage and children

Germans
To refuse admitting under your roof any man whatsoever, is held wicked and inhuman. Every man receives every comer, and treats him with repasts as large as his ability can possibly furnish.
Ger Chapter 21: Feuds and friends

Germans
To continue drinking night and day without intermission, is a reproach to no man.
Ger Chapter 22: Life at home

Germans
For their drink, they draw a liquor from barley or other grain; and ferment the same, so as to make it resemble wine.
Ger Chapter 23: Food and drink

Germans
Since stupid and spiritless they account it, to acquire by their sweat what they can gain by their blood.
Ger Chapter 14: On the battle-field

Germans
Silver and gold the Gods have denied them, whether in mercy or in wrath, I am unable to determine
Ger Chapter 5: The country

Germans
And there was formerly a time when the Gauls excelled the Germans in prowess, and waged war on them offensively, and, on account of the great number of their people and the insufficiency of their land, sent colonies over the Rhine.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 24: Previous wars between Gauls and Germans.

Germans
But the Germans, ..., do not obey orders, and cannot be controlled, but always act according to their own caprice
Quote by Julius Civilis
His Book IV Chapter 76: The Batavian Uprise. Conflict of opinions

Germans
To injure guests they regard as impious; they defend from wrong those who have come to them for any purpose whatever, and esteem them inviolable; to them the houses of all are open and maintenance is freely supplied.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 23: The Germans: their wars.

Germans
They do not pay much attention to agriculture, and a large portion of their food consists in milk, cheese and flesh; nor has any one a fixed quantity of land or his own individual limits; but the magistrates and the leading men each year apportion to the tribes and families, who have united together, as much land as, and in the place in which, they think proper, and the year after compel them to remove elsewhere.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 22: The Germans: their agriculture.

Germans
They have a tradition that Hercules also had been in their country, and him above all other heroes they extol in their songs when they advance to battle.
Ger Chapter 3: Hercules and Ulysses

Germans
Besides there are some of opinion, that Ulysses, whilst he wandered about in his long and fabulous voyages, was carried into this ocean and entered Germany, and that by him Asciburgium was founded and named, a city at this day standing and inhabited upon the bank of the Rhine: nay, that in the same place was formerly found an altar dedicated to Ulysses, with the name of his father Laertes added to his own, and that upon the confines of Germany and Rhaetia are still extant certain monuments and tombs inscribed with Greek characters.
Ger Chapter 3: Hercules and Ulysses

Germans
To the use of lots and auguries, they are addicted beyond all other nations.
Ger Chapter 10: Omens and divining

Germans
Their lands, however somewhat different in aspect, yet taken all together consist of gloomy forests or nasty marshes
Ger Chapter 5: The country

Germans
Playing at dice is one of their most serious employments.
Ger Chapter 23: Food and drink

Germans
They carry javelins or, in their own language, framms, pointed with a piece of iron short and narrow, but so sharp and manageable, that with the same weapon they can fight at a distance or hand to hand, just as need requires
Ger Chapter 6: The army

Germans
The most glaring disgrace that can befall them, is to have quitted their shield; nor to one branded with such ignominy is it lawful to join in their sacrifices, or to enter into their assemblies; and many who have escaped in the day of battle, have hanged themselves to put an end to this their infamy.
Ger Chapter 6: The army

Germans
But to none else but the priests is it allowed to exercise correction, or to inflict bonds or stripes. Nor when the Priests do this, is the same considered as a punishment, or arising from the orders of the general, but from the immediate command of the Deity, Him whom they believe to accompany them in war.
Ger Chapter 6: The army

Germans
Their wounds and maims they carry to their mothers, or to their wives, neither are their mothers or wives shocked in telling, or in sucking their bleeding sores
Ger Chapter 7: Generals and soldiers

Germans
The Germans, a people who delight in war
His Book IV Chapter 16: The Batavian Uprise. The start

Germans
In history we find, that some armies already yielding and ready to fly, have been by the women restored, through their inflexible importunity and entreaty, presenting their breasts, and showing their impending captivity; an evil to the Germans then by far most dreadful when it befalls their women.
Ger Chapter 8: The women

Germans
Hence amongst such a mighty multitude of men, the same make and form is found in all, eyes stern and blue, yellow hair, huge bodies, but vigorous only in the first onset
Ger Chapter 4: The German race

Germans
The barbarians across the Rhine sing savage songs composed in language not unlike the croaking of harsh-voiced birds, and that they delight in such songs.
Msp Chapter 1

Germans
Germany is conspicuous for the terrors of its climate
Ann Book II Chapter 15: War with the Germans. Words of the German leaders.

Germans
Cowards, and sluggards, and unnatural prostitutes they smother in mud and bogs under an heap of hurdles
Ger Chapter 12: Justice

Germans
These Romans were the most cowardly fugitives out of Varus's army, men who rather than endure war had taken to mutiny.
Quote by Arminius
Ann Book II Chapter 15: War with the Germans. Words of the German leaders.

Germans
Moreover, besides the dangers from a sea tempestuous, horrid and unknown, who would relinquish Asia, or Africa, or Italy, to repair to Germany, a region hideous and rude, under a rigorous climate, dismal to behold or to manure unless the same were his native country?
Ger Chapter 2: Origin of the Germans

Germans
Again, though their frames are terrible to the eye and formidable in a brief onset, they have no capacity of enduring wounds; without, any shame at the disgrace, without any regard to their leaders, they quit the field and flee; they quail under disaster, just as in success they forget alike divine and human laws.
Quote by Germanicus
Ann Book II Chapter 14: War with the Germans. An assembly.

Germans
The German has neither cuirass nor helmet; even his shield is not strengthened with leather or steel, but is of osiers woven together or of thin and painted board.
Quote by Germanicus
Ann Book II Chapter 14: War with the Germans. An assembly.

Germans
Those who have remained chaste for the longest time, receive the greatest commendation among their people; they think that by this the growth is promoted, by this the physical powers are increased and the sinews are strengthened. And to have had knowledge of a woman before the twentieth year they reckon among the most disgraceful acts; of which matter there is no concealment, because they bathe promiscuously in the rivers and [only] use skins or small cloaks of deer's hides a large portion of the body being in consequence naked.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 21: The Germans: their gods and marriages.

Germans
They esteem it their greatest praise as a nation, that the lands about their territories lie unoccupied to a very great extent,
Dbg Book IV Chapter 3: War with the Germans. About the Suevi(Cont.)

Germans
They on no account permit wine to be imported to them, because they consider that men degenerate in their powers of enduring fatigue, and are rendered effeminate by that commodity.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 2: War with the Germans. About the Suevi(Cont.)

Germans
The usual laziness of Germans.
Ger Chapter 45: Aestyans, amber and Sitones

Germans
Their extreme eagerness for the water and their impatience of the heat weakened the constitutions of the Germans and Gauls, always liable to disease.
His Book II Chapter 93: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius' army

Germans
The Gauls they urged to fight for freedom, the Batavi for glory, the Germans for plunder.
His Book IV Chapter 78: The Batavian Uprise. Cerialis victorious

Germans
Traitors and deserters they hang upon trees.
Ger Chapter 12: Justice

Germans
While the gladiators were making their way to it in boats, the Germans swam and outstripped them. A considerable number, as it chanced, had effected the passage,
His Book II Chapter 35: Otho versus Vitellius. An island in the Padus

Germans
That they are inferior to the Suevi alone, to whom not even the immortal gods can show themselves equal; that there was none at all besides on earth whom they could not conquer."
Dbg Book IV Chapter 7: War with the Germans. German embassadors.

Germans
They rank in the number of the gods those alone whom they behold, and by whose instrumentality they are obviously benefited, namely, the sun, fire, and the moon; they have not heard of the other deities even by report.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 21: The Germans: their gods and marriages.

Goths
Now Mars has always been worshipped by the Goths with cruel rites, and captives were slain as his victims.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Goths
By demonstrating theoretical knowledge he urged them to contemplate the twelve signs and the courses of the planets passing through them, and the whole of astronomy. He told them how the disc of the moon gains increase or suffers loss, and showed them how much the fiery globe of the sun exceeds in size our earthly planet. He explained the names of the three hundred and forty-six stars and told through what signs in the arching vault of the heavens they glide swiftly from their rising to their setting.
Gth Chapter 11: Dicineus.

Goths
He taught them logic and made them skilled in reasoning beyond all other races; he showed them practical knowledge and so persuaded them to abound in good works.
Gth Chapter 11: Dicineus.

Goths
He taught them almost the whole of philosophy, for he was a skilled master of this subject.
Gth Chapter 11: Dicineus.

Goths
The Scythians, whom ancient tradition asserts to have been the husbands of the Amazons.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Goths
They were the first race of men to string the bow with cords
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Greece
The Greek mind eagerly fastens on what is new and marvellous.
Ann Book V Chapter 10: A double of Drusus

Greece
21 (For all the Athenians and strangers which were there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing.)
Nwt Acts chapter 17

Greece
They still retained the indolence and licence of the Greek
His Book III Chapter 47: Revolt of Anicetus

Greece
The Greeks seek after wisdom
Quote by Paul
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 1

Greece
Think ye the gifts of Greece can lack for guile?
Quote by Laocoon
Vrg Book II Chapter 4: Speech of Laocoon

Greece
I fear the Greeks, though gift on gift they bear.
Quote by Laocoon
Vrg Book II Chapter 4: Speech of Laocoon

Hercynian Forest
There is an ox of the shape of a stag, between whose ears a horn rises from the middle of the forehead, higher and straighter than those horns which are known to us. From the top of this, branches, like palms, stretch out a considerable distance. The shape of the female and of the male is the same; the appearance and the size of the horns is the same.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 26: The Germans: A kind of unicorn.

Hercynian Forest
There is a third kind, consisting of those animals which are called uri. These are a little below the elephant in size, and of the appearance, color, and shape of a bull. Their strength and speed are extraordinary; they spare neither man nor wild beast which they have espied.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 28: The Germans: The Uri.

Hercynian Forest
The breadth of this Hercynian Forest, which has been referred to above, is to a quick traveler, a journey of nine days
Dbg Book VI Chapter 25: The Germans: the Hercynian forest.

Hercynian Forest
There are also animals] which are called elks. The shape of these, and the varied color of their skins, is much like roes, but in size they surpass them a little and are destitute of horns, and have legs without joints and ligatures; nor do they lie down for the purpose of rest, nor, if they have been thrown down by any accident, can they raise or lift themselves up. Trees serve as beds to them; they lean themselves against them, and thus reclining only slightly, they take their rest; when the huntsmen have discovered from the footsteps of these animals whither they are accustomed to betake themselves, they either undermine all the trees at the roots, or cut into them so far that the upper part of the trees may appear to be left standing. When they have leant upon them, according to their habit, they knock down by their weight the unsupported trees, and fall down themselves along with them.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 27: The Germans: How to catch an Elk.

Hermondurians
They had not only a passion for settling every question by arms, but also a deep-rooted superstition that such localities are specially near to heaven, and that mortal prayers are nowhere more attentively heard by the gods.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 57: Events in the North. Chatti and Hermunduri

Hermondurians
The Hermondurians, a people, faithful to the Romans
Ger Chapter 41: The Hermondurians

Herulians
The Heruli, who lay claim to preeminence among all the nations of Scandza for their tallness.
Gth Chapter 3: About Scandza.

Huns
The Huns, fiercer than ferocity itself
Gth Chapter 24: Origin of the Huns.

Huns
Filimer, king of the Goths, son of Gadaric the Great, who was the fifth in succession to hold the rule of the Getae after their departure from the of Scandza, -- and who, as we have said, entered the land of Scythia with his tribe, -- found among his people certain witches, whom he called in his native tongue Haliurunnae. Suspecting these women, he expelled them from the midst of his race and compelled them to wander in solitary exile afar from his army. (122) There the unclean spirits, who beheld them as they wandered through the wilderness, bestowed their embraces upon them and begat this savage race, which dwelt at first in the swamps, -- a stunted, foul and puny tribe, scarcely human, and having no language save one which bore but slight resemblance to human speech. Such was the descent of the Huns who came to the country of the Goths.
Gth Chapter 24: Origin of the Huns.

Huns
The Huns, who had been wholly ignorant that there was another world beyond Maeotis
Gth Chapter 24: Origin of the Huns.

India
Vanquished India gave lynxes to Bacchus of the clustered vines, and, they say that, whatever their bladder emits, changes to stone, and solidifies on contact with air. So coral, also, hardens the first time air touches it: it was a soft plant under the waves.'
Quote by Ajax
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

Ireland
Its extent is small when compared with Britain, but exceeds the islands of our seas. In soil and climate, in the disposition, temper, and habits of its population, it differs but little from Britain. We know most of its harbours and approaches, and that through the intercourse of commerce. One of the petty kings of the nation, driven out by internal faction, had been received by Agricola, who detained him under the semblance of friendship till he could make use of him. I have often heard him say that a single legion with a few auxiliaries could conquer and occupy Ireland, and that it would have a salutary effect on Britain for the Roman arms to be seen everywhere, and for freedom, so to speak, to be banished from its sight.
Agr Chapter 24: Agricola in Britain. On Ireland

Ireland
In that part of Britain which looks toward Ireland, he posted some troops, hoping for fresh conquests rather than fearing attack, inasmuch as Ireland, being between Britain and Spain and conveniently situated for the seas round Gaul, might have been the means of connecting with great mutual benefit the most powerful parts of the empire.
Agr Chapter 24: Agricola in Britain. On Ireland

Izmir
The people of Smyrna quoted an oracle of Apollo, which had commanded them to dedicate a temple to Venus Stratonicis
Ann Book III Chapter 63: Sanctuaries in Greece: Pergamus, Smyrna, Tenos, Miletus, Crete

Jerusalem
The founders of the state had foreseen that frequent wars would result from the singularity of its customs, and so had made every provision against the most protracted walls. After the capture of their city by Pompey, experience and apprehension taught them much. Availing themselves of the sordid policy of the Claudian era to purchase the right of fortification, they raised in time of peace such walls as were suited for war.
His Book V Chapter 12: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Jerusalem
34 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!
Quote by Jesus
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 13.

Jerusalem
33 Nevertheless I must walk to day, and to morrow, and the day following: for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem.
Quote by Jesus
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 13.

Jews
The founders of the state had foreseen that frequent wars would result from the singularity of its customs, and so had made every provision against the most protracted walls. After the capture of their city by Pompey, experience and apprehension taught them much. Availing themselves of the sordid policy of the Claudian era to purchase the right of fortification, they raised in time of peace such walls as were suited for war.
His Book V Chapter 12: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Jews
When the Macedonians became supreme, king Antiochus strove to destroy the national superstition, and to introduce Greek civilization, but was prevented by his war with the Parthians from at all improving this vilest of nations; for at this time the revolt of Arsaces had taken place.
His Book V Chapter 8: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
There had spread over all the Orient an old and established belief, that it was fated at that time for men coming from Judaea to rule the world.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 4: In the army

Jews
The Jewish religion is tasteless and mean.
His Book V Chapter 5: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
There was a firm persuasion, that in the ancient records of their priests was contained a prediction of how at this very time the East was to grow powerful, and rulers, coming from Judaea, were to acquire universal empire. These mysterious prophecies had pointed to Vespasian and Titus, but the common people, with the usual blindness of ambition, had interpreted these mighty destinies of themselves, and could not be brought even by disasters to believe the truth.
His Book V Chapter 13: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Jews
The Egyptians worship many animals and image of monstrous form; the Jews have purely mental conceptions of Deity, as one in essence. They call those profane who make representations of God in human shape out of perishable materials. They believe that Being to be supreme and eternal, neither capable of representation, nor of decay. They therefore do not allow any images to stand in their cities, much less in their temples. This flattery is not paid to their kings, nor this honour to our Emperors.
His Book V Chapter 5: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
Cneius Pompeius was the first of our countrymen to subdue the Jews. Availing himself of the right of conquest, he entered the temple. Thus it became commonly known that the place stood empty with no similitude of gods within, and that the shrine had nothing to reveal.
His Book V Chapter 9: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
Some say that the Jews were fugitives from the island of Crete, who settled on the nearest coast of Africa about the time when Saturn was driven from his throne by the power of Jupiter. Evidence of this is sought in the name. There is a famous mountain in Crete called Ida; the neighbouring tribe, the Idaei, came to be called Judaei by a barbarous lengthening of the national name.
His Book V Chapter 2: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus

Jews
Others assert that in the reign of Isis the overflowing population of Egypt, led by Hierosolymus and Judas, discharged itself into the neighbouring countries.
His Book V Chapter 2: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus

Jews
Many, again, say that they were a race of Ethiopian origin, who in the time of king Cepheus were driven by fear and hatred of their neighbours to seek a new dwelling-place.
His Book V Chapter 2: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus

Jews
Others, again, assign a very distinguished origin to the Jews, alleging that they were the Solymi, a nation celebrated in the poems of Homer, who called the city which they founded Hierosolyma after their own name.
His Book V Chapter 2: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus

Jews
Others describe them as an Assyrian horde who, not having sufficient territory, took possession of part of Egypt, and founded cities of their own in what is called the Hebrew country, lying on the borders of Syria.
His Book V Chapter 2: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus

Jews
Most writers, however, agree in stating that once a disease, which horribly disfigured the body, broke out over Egypt; that king Bocchoris, seeking a remedy, consulted the oracle of Hammon, and was bidden to cleanse his realm, and to convey into some foreign land this race detested by the gods. The people, who had been collected after diligent search, finding themselves left in a desert, sat for the most part in a stupor of grief, till one of the exiles, Moyses by name, warned them not to look for any relief from God or man, forsaken as they were of both, but to trust to themselves, taking for their heaven-sent leader that man who should first help them to be quit of their present misery.
His Book V Chapter 3: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
Moyses, wishing to secure for the future his authority over the nation, gave them a novel form of worship, opposed to all that is practised by other men. Things sacred with us, with them have no sanctity, while they allow what with us is forbidden. In their holy place they have consecrated an image of the animal by whose guidance they found deliverance from their long and thirsty wanderings. They slay the ram, seemingly in derision of Hammon, and they sacrifice the ox, because the Egyptians worship it as Apis. They abstain from swine's flesh, in consideration of what they suffered when they were infected by the leprosy to which this animal is liable. By their frequent fasts they still bear witness to the long hunger of former days, and the Jewish bread, made without leaven, is retained as a memorial of their hurried seizure of corn.
His Book V Chapter 3: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
All their other customs, which are at once perverse and disgusting, owe their strength to their very badness. The most degraded out of other races, scorning their national beliefs, brought to them their contributions and presents. This augmented the wealth of the Jews, as also did the fact, that among themselves they are inflexibly honest and ever ready to shew compassion, though they regard the rest of mankind with all the hatred of enemies. They sit apart at meals, they sleep apart, and though, as a nation, they are singularly prone to lust, they abstain from intercourse with foreign women; among themselves nothing is unlawful. Circumcision was adopted by them as a mark of difference from other men.
His Book V Chapter 5: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
There was a debate too about expelling the Egyptian and Jewish worship, and a resolution of the Senate was passed that four thousand of the freedmen class who were infected with those superstitions and were of military age should be transported to the island of Sardinia to quell the brigandage of the place, a cheap sacrifice should they die from the pestilential climate.
Ann Book II Chapter 85: On prostitution.

Jews
We ought to write as we speak
Stn Augustus, Chapter 88: His spelling.

Jews
It is a crime among them to kill any newly-born infant. They hold that the souls of all who perish in battle or by the hands of the executioner are immortal. Hence a passion for propagating their race and a contempt for death. They are wont to bury rather than to burn their dead, following in this the Egyptian custom; they bestow the same care on the dead, and they hold the same belief about the World.
His Book V Chapter 5: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus (cont.)

Jews
At the height of the public grief a throng of foreigners went about lamenting each after the fashion of his country, above all the Jews, who even flocked to the place for several successive nights.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 84: The funeral of Julius Caesar (cont.)

Jews
He abolished foreign cults, especially the Egyptian and the Jewish rites, compelling all who were addicted to such superstitions to burn their religious vestments and all their paraphernalia
Stn Tiberius Chapter 36: Foreign cults.

Kadikoy
When they consulted the Pythian Apollo as to where they should found a city, the oracle replied that they were to seek a home opposite to the blind men's country. This obscure hint pointed to the people of Chalcedon, who, though they arrived there first and saw before others the advantageous position, chose the worse.
Ann Book XII Chapter 63: On Byzantium

Lingon
I have never cultivated eloquence; it is by my sword that I have asserted the excellence of the Roman people. Since, however, words have very great weight with you, since you estimate good and evil, not according to their real value, but according to the representations of seditious men, I have resolved to say a few words, which, as the war is at an end, it may be useful for you to have heard rather than for me to have spoken.
His Book IV Chapter 73: The Batavian Uprise. Speech of Cerialis

Lyons
Lugdunum was consoled by the prince for a ruinous disaster by a gift of four million sesterces, so that what was lost to the city might be replaced. Its people had previously offered this same amount for the distresses of Rome.
Ann Book XVI Chapter 13: Storms and pestilence

Lyons
The disaffection of the colony of Lugdunum, which obstinately adhered to Nero
His Book I Chapter 51: Revolt of Vitellius. The start

Lyons
The old feud between Lugdunum and Vienna had been kindled afresh by the late war. They had inflicted many losses on each other so continuously and so savagely that they could not have been fighting only for Nero or Galba. Galba had made his displeasure the occasion for diverting into the Imperial treasury the revenues of Lugdunum, while he had treated Vienna with marked respect. Thence came rivalry and dislike, and the two states, separated only by a river, were linked together by perpetual feud. Accordingly the people of Lugdunum began to work on the passions of individual soldiers, and to goad them into destroying Vienna, by reminding them, how that people had besieged their colony, had abetted the attempts of Vindex, and had recently raised legions for Galba. After parading these pretexts for quarrel, they pointed out how vast would be the plunder. From secret encouragement they passed to open entreaty. "Go," they said, "to avenge us and utterly destroy this home of Gallic rebellion.There all are foreigners and enemies; we are a Roman colony, a part of the Roman army, sharers in your successes and reverses. Fortune may declare against us. Do not abandon us to an angry foe."
His Book I Chapter 65: Revolt of Vitellius. Lugdunum and Vienna

Manisa
Next the people of Magnesia relied on arrangements made by Lucius Scipio and Lucius Sulla. These generals, after respectively defeating Antiochus and Mithridates, honoured the fidelity and courage of the Magnesians by allowing the temple of Diana of the White Brow to be an inviolable sanctuary
Ann Book III Chapter 62: Sanctuaries in Greece: Magnesia, Aphrodisia, Stratonicea and Cyprus

Meuse
For the Rhine after flowing continuously in a single channel or encircling merely insignificant islands, divides itself, so to say, where the Batavian territory begins, into two rivers, retaining its name and the rapidity of its course in the stream which washes Germany, till it mingles with the ocean. On the Gallic bank, its flow is broader and gentler; it is called by an altered name, the Vahal, by the inhabitants of its shore. Soon that name too is changed for the Mosa river, through whose vast mouth it empties itself into the same ocean.
Ann Book II Chapter 6: War with the Germans. Preparations.

Naples
Parthenope, born for idleness
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 15: 622-744 Aesculapius, the god, saves Rome from plague

Nervians
That there was no access for merchants to them; that they suffered no wine and other things tending to luxury to be imported; because, they thought that by their use the mind is enervated and the courage impaired: that they were a savage people and of great bravery: that they upbraided and condemned the rest of the Belgae who had surrendered themselves to the Roman people and thrown aside their national courage: that they openly declared they would neither send embassadors, nor accept any condition of peace."
Dbg Book II Chapter 15: War with the Belgae. About the Nervii.

Netherlands
The Rhine divides into several branches; and, having formed many and extensive islands, a great part of which are inhabited by savage and barbarous nations (of whom there are some who are supposed to live on fish and the eggs of sea-fowl), flows into the ocean by several mouths.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 10: War with the Germans. The Rhine and the peoples living along it.

Olympus
At this place Mount Olympus rises in height more than ten furlongs.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 14: An attempt of the Romans to conquer a passage

Paris
My beloved Lutetia
Msp Chapter 5

Raetia
The Alpine tribes are undoubtedly of the same [Etruscan] stock, especially the Raetii, who had through the nature of their country become so uncivilised that they retained no trace of their original condition except their language, and even this was not free from corruption.
Hor Book V Chapter 33: The Migrations of the Gauls into Italy.

Rhine
Civilis had also thrown a dam obliquely across the Rhine, so that the stream, diverted by the obstacle, might overflow the adjacent country.
His Book V Chapter 14: The Batavian Uprise. Civilis at Castra Vetera

Rhine
The Rhine, a very broad and deep river, which separates the Helvetian territory from the Germans;
Dbg Book I Chapter 2: The conspiration of Orgetorix About the Helvetii.

Rhine
For the Rhine after flowing continuously in a single channel or encircling merely insignificant islands, divides itself, so to say, where the Batavian territory begins, into two rivers, retaining its name and the rapidity of its course in the stream which washes Germany, till it mingles with the ocean. On the Gallic bank, its flow is broader and gentler; it is called by an altered name, the Vahal, by the inhabitants of its shore. Soon that name too is changed for the Mosa river, through whose vast mouth it empties itself into the same ocean.
Ann Book II Chapter 6: War with the Germans. Preparations.

Rome
He employed methods against it which were anything but Roman, namely, fraud and deceit
Hor Book I Chapter 52: Treaty with the Latins.

Rome
And the whole city was thrown into a state of alarm by the running up and down of persons who made vague additions to what they heard, and thus increased the confusion which the original intelligence created.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 9: The conspiration is executed

Rome
Robbers the of world, having by their universal plunder exhausted the land, they rifle the deep. If the enemy be rich, they are rapacious; if he be poor, they lust for dominion; neither the east nor the west has been able to satisfy them.
Agr Chapter 30: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Galcagus

Rome
Their inborn activity of mind
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 14: Hannibal marches against Nola.

Rome
A single king once ruled us; now two are set over us; a legate to tyrannise over our lives, a procurator to tyrannise over our property. Their quarrels and their harmony are alike ruinous to their subjects. The centurions of the one, the slaves of the other, combine violence with insult. Nothing is now safe from their avarice, nothing from their lust. In war it is the strong who plunders; now, it is for the most part by cowards and poltroons that our homes are rifled, our children torn from us, the conscription enforced, as though it were for our country alone that we could not die.
Agr Chapter 15: Further problems in Britain (cont.)

Rome
The Romans could not be diverted from Capua by the blockade of Rome, by their wives and children, whose lamentations could almost be heard from this place, by their altars, their hearths, the temples of their gods, and the sepulchres of their ancestors profaned and violated. So great was their avidity to bring us to punishment, so insatiable their thirst for drinking our blood.
Quote by Vibius Virrius
Hor Book XXV Chapter 13: The siege of Capua: the start.

Rome
If you Romans choose to lord it over the world, does it follow that the world is to accept slavery?
Quote by Caratacus
Ann Book XII Chapter 37: Problems in Britain. Caractacus (cont.)

Rome
The Roman power would hardly have reached so high a pitch without a divinely ordered origin, attended with great and extraordinary circumstances.
Plt Romulus, chapter 8: The Foundation of Rome (cont.)

Rome
The Romans, masters of the whole round world, who, clad in peaceful toga, judge mankind.
Vrg Book I Chapter 18: The future: Romulus, Julius Caesar.

Rome
To these I give no bounded times or power, but empire without end.
Quote by Publius Vedius Pollio
Vrg Book I Chapter 18: The future: Romulus, Julius Caesar.

Rome
I see, even now, a city, destined for Phrygian descendants, than which none is greater, or shall be, or has been, in past ages. Other leaders will make her powerful, through the long centuries, but one, born of the blood of Iulus, will make her mistress of the world.
Quote by Helenus
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 11: 418-452 Pythagoras' Teachings:Transfers of Power

Rome
Rome, the capital of the world.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 15: 622-744 Aesculapius, the god, saves Rome from plague

Rome
"Go," said he, "tell the Romans that it is the will of heaven that my Rome should be the head of all the world. Let them henceforth cultivate the arts of war, and let them know assuredly, and hand down the knowledge to posterity, that no human might can withstand the arms of Rome."
Hor Book I Chapter 16: Disappearance of Romulus.

Sagunto
For to whom of those men could mercy have been shown, who, either shut up with their wives and children, burned their houses over their own heads, or abroad in arms made no end of fighting, except in death.
Hor Book XXI Chapter 14: Saguntum taken

Santa Maria di Capua
The Romans could not be diverted from Capua by the blockade of Rome, by their wives and children, whose lamentations could almost be heard from this place, by their altars, their hearths, the temples of their gods, and the sepulchres of their ancestors profaned and violated. So great was their avidity to bring us to punishment, so insatiable their thirst for drinking our blood.
Quote by Vibius Virrius
Hor Book XXV Chapter 13: The siege of Capua: the start.

Sardinia
There was a debate too about expelling the Egyptian and Jewish worship, and a resolution of the Senate was passed that four thousand of the freedmen class who were infected with those superstitions and were of military age should be transported to the island of Sardinia to quell the brigandage of the place, a cheap sacrifice should they die from the pestilential climate.
Ann Book II Chapter 85: On prostitution.

Sart
The envoys from Sardis read a decree of the Etrurians, with whom they claimed kindred. " Tyrrhenus and Lydus," it was said, "the sons of king Atys, divided the nation between them because of its multitude; Lydus remained in the country of his fathers; Tyrrhenus had the work assigned him of establishing new settlements, and names, taken from the two leaders, were given to the one people in Asia and to the other in Italy.
Quote by Zosimus
Ann Book IV Chapter 53: Agrippina wants to remarry

Scandinavia
In the northern part of the island the race of the Adogit live, who are said to have continual light in midsummer for forty days and nights, and who likewise have no clear light in the winter season for the same number of days and nights.
Gth Chapter 3: About Scandza.

Scandinavia
The same mighty sea has also in its arctic region, that is in the north, a great island named Scandza
Gth Chapter 1: Geographical Introduction.

Scandinavia
Claudius Ptolemaeus, an excellent describer of the world, has made mention of it in the second book of his work, saying: "There is a great island situated in the surge of the Northern Ocean, Scandza by name, in the shape of a juniper leaf with bulging sides that taper down to a point at a long end."
Gth Chapter 3: About Scandza.

Scotland
The red hair and large limbs of the inhabitants of Caledonia point clearly to a German origin. The dark complexion of the Silures, their usually curly hair, and the fact that Spain is the opposite shore to them, are an evidence that Iberians of a former date crossed over and occupied these parts. Those who are nearest to the Gauls are also like them, either from the permanent influence of original descent, or, because in countries which run out so far to meet each other, climate has produced similar physical qualities.
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons

Scotland
The inhabitants of Caledonia have reddish hair and large loose-jointed bodies
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Scythian
The Scythians, whom ancient tradition asserts to have been the husbands of the Amazons.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Spain
The tempers of the Spaniards themselves are naturally restless, and eager for innovation
Hor Book XXII Chapter 21: Further disturbances in Spain.

Sri Lanka
Taprobane, a fair island wherein there are towns or estates and ten strongly fortified cities
Gth Chapter 1: Geographical Introduction.

Suevians
This people are remarkable for a peculiar custom, that of twisting their hair and binding it up in a knot.
Ger Chapter 38: The Suevians

Suevians
That they are inferior to the Suevi alone, to whom not even the immortal gods can show themselves equal; that there was none at all besides on earth whom they could not conquer."
Dbg Book IV Chapter 7: War with the Germans. German embassadors.

Suevians
For when the Romans had departed and they were free from the fear of an invader, these tribes, according to the custom of the race, and then specially as rivals in fame, had turned their arms against each other
Ann Book II Chapter 44: War with the Germans. Drusus as commander.

Sugambrians
Sugambrian cohort drawn up at no great distance by the Roman general, ready for any emergency and as terrible as the foe, with the noise of their war songs and the clashing of their arms.
Ann Book IV Chapter 47: Revolt in Thracia (cont.)

Switzerland
There was no doubt that the Helvetii were the most powerful of the whole of Gaul
Dbg Book I Chapter 2: The conspiration of Orgetorix About the Helvetii.

Switzerland
The Helvetii also surpass the rest of the Gauls in valor, as they contend with the Germans in almost daily battles, when they either repel them from their own territories, or themselves wage war on their frontiers.
Dbg Book I Chapter 1: Introduction

Taranto
We have lost Tarentum by the same practices by which we gained it
Quote by Hannibal
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 16: Tarentum plundered; Fabius is not trapped.

Tencterians
The Tencterians surpass in the service and discipline of their cavalry.
Ger Chapter 32: Usipians and Tencterians

Tencterians
But that our friendship and union may be established for ever, we require of you to strip your city of its walls, which are the bulwarks of slavery. Even savage animals, if you keep them in confinement, forget their natural courage. We require of you to massacre all Romans within your territory; liberty and a dominant race cannot well exist together. Let the property of the slain come into a common stock, so that no one may be able to secrete anything, or to detach his own interest from ours. Let it be lawful for us and for you to inhabit both banks of the Rhine, as it was of old for our ancestors.
His Book IV Chapter 64: The Batavian Uprise. The Tencteri speak

Thrace
Some Thracian tribes whose wild life in the highlands of a mountainous country made them unusually fierce
Ann Book IV Chapter 46: Revolt in Thracia

Treves
I have never cultivated eloquence; it is by my sword that I have asserted the excellence of the Roman people. Since, however, words have very great weight with you, since you estimate good and evil, not according to their real value, but according to the representations of seditious men, I have resolved to say a few words, which, as the war is at an end, it may be useful for you to have heard rather than for me to have spoken.
His Book IV Chapter 73: The Batavian Uprise. Speech of Cerialis

Troy
His favorite spectacle was the Trojan game acted by a select number of boys, in parties differing in age and station; thinking that it was a practice both excellent in itself, and sanctioned by ancient usage, that the spirit of the young nobles should be displayed in such exercises.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 43: On spectacles.

Troy
When a deputation from Ilium offered him somewhat belated condolences, he replied with a smile, as if the memory of his bereavement had faded from his mind, that they, too, had his sympathy for the loss of their eminent fellow-citizen Hector.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 52: Death of Germanicus and Drusus

Troy
And so after visiting Ilium and surveying a scene venerable from the vicissitudes of fortune and as the birth-place of our people
Ann Book II Chapter 54: Germanicus goes East. To Colophon.

Troy
O breed of iron men.
Vrg Book III Chapter 6: Answer of Apollo

Ubians
But that our friendship and union may be established for ever, we require of you to strip your city of its walls, which are the bulwarks of slavery. Even savage animals, if you keep them in confinement, forget their natural courage. We require of you to massacre all Romans within your territory; liberty and a dominant race cannot well exist together. Let the property of the slain come into a common stock, so that no one may be able to secrete anything, or to detach his own interest from ours. Let it be lawful for us and for you to inhabit both banks of the Rhine, as it was of old for our ancestors.
His Book IV Chapter 64: The Batavian Uprise. The Tencteri speak

Ubians
They indeed formerly came from beyond the Rhine, and, for the many proofs of their fidelity, were settled upon the very bank of the river; not to be there confined or guarded themselves, but to guard and defend that boundary against the rest of the Germans.
Ger Chapter 28: The Germans in general

Vienne
The old feud between Lugdunum and Vienna had been kindled afresh by the late war. They had inflicted many losses on each other so continuously and so savagely that they could not have been fighting only for Nero or Galba. Galba had made his displeasure the occasion for diverting into the Imperial treasury the revenues of Lugdunum, while he had treated Vienna with marked respect. Thence came rivalry and dislike, and the two states, separated only by a river, were linked together by perpetual feud. Accordingly the people of Lugdunum began to work on the passions of individual soldiers, and to goad them into destroying Vienna, by reminding them, how that people had besieged their colony, had abetted the attempts of Vindex, and had recently raised legions for Galba. After parading these pretexts for quarrel, they pointed out how vast would be the plunder. From secret encouragement they passed to open entreaty. "Go," they said, "to avenge us and utterly destroy this home of Gallic rebellion.There all are foreigners and enemies; we are a Roman colony, a part of the Roman army, sharers in your successes and reverses. Fortune may declare against us. Do not abandon us to an angry foe."
His Book I Chapter 65: Revolt of Vitellius. Lugdunum and Vienna

Waal
For the Rhine after flowing continuously in a single channel or encircling merely insignificant islands, divides itself, so to say, where the Batavian territory begins, into two rivers, retaining its name and the rapidity of its course in the stream which washes Germany, till it mingles with the ocean. On the Gallic bank, its flow is broader and gentler; it is called by an altered name, the Vahal, by the inhabitants of its shore. Soon that name too is changed for the Mosa river, through whose vast mouth it empties itself into the same ocean.
Ann Book II Chapter 6: War with the Germans. Preparations.